IBM’s new Neurosynaptic Chips – Technology Inspired by the Brain

IBM’s new Neurosynaptic Chips – Technology Inspired by the Brain

Called cognitive computers, systems built with these chips won’t be programmed the same way traditional computers are today. Rather, cognitive computers are expected to learn through experiences, find correlations, create hypotheses, and remember – and learn from – the outcomes, mimicking the brains structural and synaptic plasticity.

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Zygmunt Bauman: Sobre benefícios e malefícios do Facebook.

Zygmunt Bauman: Sobre benefícios e malefícios do Facebook.

World-renowned Polish sociologist Sygmunt Bauman, one of the most significant global social thinkers of our age, reveals some startling and incredibly revealing thoughts on the dramatic evolution of the concept of “friends” as brought about by Facebook and social networks.

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Neil deGrasse Tyson at UB: What NASA Means to America’s Future

Neil deGrasse Tyson at UB: What NASA Means to America’s Future

Far more than landing men on the moon and other planets, NASA provides a vital role in shaping the dreams and futures of American youth.

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Student Seeks Books for a Peopled Planet

Student Seeks Books for a Peopled Planet

Check out an excerpt from NYTimes DOTEarth blogger Andrew Revkin, who wrote in his column this week about the New Earth Archive!   March 10, 2012, 9:15 AM Students Seek Books For a Peopled Planet By ANDREW C. REVKIN Aaron Houston for the New York Times Some question whether books are needed in school libraries any more. But some students [...]

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James Hoggan: Lessons on Climate Change Denial

James Hoggan: Lessons on Climate Change Denial

When James Hoggan started Desmogblog six years ago he was infuriated watching his colleagues shamelessly manipulate public opinion. He wanted to help people become more savvy about how the PR game really works. In writing Climate Cover Up, Hoggan realized that the problem was much deeper than the broken public conversation about climate change.

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John Petersen, The Oberlin Project: Multiple Modes and Scales of Feedback

John Petersen, The Oberlin Project: Multiple Modes and Scales of Feedback

Real-time consumer feedback is being used in a revolutionary manner to reduce residential electricity and material consumption. In this presentation Petersen considers collaboration between researchers at Oberlin College, Lucid Design Group and the City of Oberlin to develop and assess the impact of multiples scales and modes of feedback that include social, economic and ecological contextualization as mechanisms for enhancing impact.

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